Ten Reasons to Visit… Suffolk

Our’Ten Reasons to Visit’ series focuses on Suffolk this month and we have had a great time researching and compiling some fabulous local attractions for you to visit. Let us know what you think!

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Crinkle Crankle Walls

(1) Best Thing About the Area

With its crinkle crankle walls, a House in the Clouds and the Nutshell – the smallest pub in the land, Suffolk is no ordinary place and we don’t do things by halves. Bucolic scenery we have in abundance – miles of heritage coastlines stretching from Lowestoft in the North East to Felixstowe, acres of forests and watery wildlife reserves such as Minsmere – home to BBC Springwatch and our scenic country walks, eulogised by many of Britains best nature writers. We also do culture well too with historic small towns packed with independent shops, theatres and other arts activities and the larger county towns of Ipswich and Bury St Edmunds doing it all on a greater scale. Sports fans are well catered for from the sport of kings and queens at Newmarket; geocaching and orienteering on the rise; rugby clubs and excellent running, fishing and cycling facilities- Suffolk has miles of well maintained cycle trails.

Prime territory for foodies with our famous bacons, hams, local vegetables and fruit; the breweries and bakers plus a raft of award winning places to eat, the very best of Britain can be found under these wide Suffolk skies. This is the county for castles and stately homes with many fine examples and ruins of important residences from times past. Framlingham Castle is one of the most spectacular with a packed timetable of events for families year round and Kentwell Hall is internationally famous for its Tudor Recreations.

Suffolk is a fabulous place to bring a family up in too with easy access, not only to all that Suffolk offers but also to London and Cambridge- the former is only an hour away by car or public transport, putting a working commute within reach. Local community organisations work very hard to welcome new families and we’d love you to contact us if you are looking to put down stronger roots here- we can help you settle in with our network of local Mumsnetters, meet ups and other groups.

(2) Best Child Friendly Cafe

Tucked away inside one of our great museums, the Osiers Cafe is heavenly for families with broad grassy seating areas, lots of ride on tractors, ducks to play with and a simple menu of freshly cooked meals, snacks and kids lunchbox specials. The Wild Strawberry Cafe in Woodbridge is a pretty little place to stop for a coffee whilst kids occupy themselves with free colouring and if you are in Sudbury, the Honey B has a play area, breastfeeding room for Mums who want more privacy (although they are welcomed with open arms everywhere in this lovely cafe), free Sunday papers and WiFi. Oh and the food ls super tasty.

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Osier cafe

(3) Best Child- Free Night Out

Our restaurants have really raised their game. From modern Indian at Orissa , the amazingly creative food at Darsham Nurseries – praised by Marina O’Loughlin, to The Crown at Bildeston, a highly rated pub with bar food and more formal dining that still retains a warmth of welcome, we eat well here. We are spoiled for the arts in Suffolk too. The New Wolsey Theatre in Ipswich offers a cornucopia of events and a customer service second to none. We’d follow a show with a night time stroll along the Ipswich docks with its floodlit marina, late night bars and stunningly romantic views across the River Orwell. Finally, an evening out with a difference- The Cock Inn at Brent Eleigh is a tiny roadside pub that offers THE authentic and timeless Suffolk pub experience. Go there on a Tuesday evening for cheese night where the bar is filled with cheeses bought by locals who then proceed to play roots and blues music for hours on end. In the Summer the doors and windows are thrown open to the dark country night skies. It is beautiful.

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Neptune Marina

(4) Outside Space

Stunning parks, nature reserves and playgrounds makes it rather hard to choose but we’d have to single out Clare Castle Country Park for its Norman castle ruins, disused railway track walk, lakes and water birds to feed, playgrounds and the nearby gorgeous town of Clare to explore. If you want classic woodland then we’d suggest a trip to Arger Fen, especially at bluebell time. The Suffolk coastline offers miles of sandy beaches, dunes and heathlands to explore plus plenty of organised activities for all the family- Covehithe is one our our favourites for its sheer dramatic beauty and isolation. The glorious Pin Mill. estuary in Woodbridge with a stunning sunset backdrop to the miles of riverside walking is another popular beauty spot as is the village of Ramsholt. Sit by the estuary of the Deben and eat seafood at Winkles at Felixstowe Ferry after a long walk along the riverside, looking out to sea. The famous Sudbury Water meadows with swan feed at Brundon Mill, captured by many an artist and the landscaped Abbey Gardens in Bury St Edmunds, packed with town park features are both classic Suffolk tourist attractions. Brandon Country Park with a walled Edwardian garden and the nearby forests at Thetford and Santon Downham are paradise for walkers, horseriders and cyclists. We recently spent a holiday at Sweffling and walked the five heaths around Wenhaston followed by a meal at the Wenhaston Star. The undulating paths through bracken and ferns which children love to run up and down, all within a few miles of the sea make this a wonderful place for a day out or longer.

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Covehithe Beach

(5) Hidden Gem

The wonderful Museum of East Anglian Life in Stowmarket deserves to be far better known as it provides hours of fun, education and entertainment in the most perfect and beautiful setting. Surrounded by acres of shaded green lanes, woods and meadows with windmills, rare breed animals and steam engines to explore, the exhibitions cover all aspects of local life from displays of toys throughout the ages, Romany wagons (and an amazing Airstream caravan) to the history of the former local asylum and a walled garden. Kids can drive mini tractors round a fenced grassy track, play with interactive displays scattered everywhere and eat in the lovely cafe and gardens. There are buggy friendly trails, babychanging and breastfeeding is welcomed and there is a programme of baby yoga and storytime mornings year round. Knowledgeable and friendly guides are there to help enhance your experience.

(6) Community Venues

The Stomping Ground supports Ipswich families via a programme of events, a community cafe and breastfeeding support whilst the Synergy Cafe in Haverhill helps families affected by Dementia -something that is very important when you consider that many of us are caring for both children and elderly parents. Workwise in Bury St Edmunds runs its own giftshop called Cavern 4. Packed with covetable items, my Father in Law was central in establishing this local Mental Health enterprise so we are very proud of it and of the amazing artists who contribute such beautiful work.

(7) Free Visitor Attraction

The whole of our amazing coastline counts as a free visitor attraction, especially if you take a picnic and steer clear of the traditional seaside amusements. The Alfred Corry Lifeboat Museum in Southwold offers free entry although donations are appreciated to go towards upkeep. Helping install an idea of how important the sea is to people in Suffolk and how it must be respected, parents can then walk the length of Souhwold Pier and admire stunning Suffolk sea views. The pier also has free entry although the exquisitely maintained Vintage Seaside arcade games are not free to play. Walking in the Rendlesham Woods with its history of possible ‘alien spaceship ‘landings is another quirky Suffolk thing to do; follow the alien trail markings and get your children’a imaginations working overtime, especially if you walk in the late afternoon when the sun slants through the forest and gives everything a lovely spooky edge.

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The Ship at Dunwich

(8) Best Day Out

The classic Enid Blyton- esque seaside experience is there to be had in Suffolk. We recommend a drive to Dunwich where you can explore the mysteries of this drowned town and be charmed by stories of the bell apparently being heard chiming under the sea. Lunch (and a swift beer) can be had in either the rambling former smugglers and fishermens pub The Ship at Dunwich or the super traditional seaside fish and chips, eaten right next to the dunes of Dunwich Heath and pebbles of the beach at the Flora Tearooms. Spend the afternoon on the beach, wandering along Dunwich Forest or visit the tiny Dunwich Museum which tells the story of this amazing place. The drive home passes through plenty of beautiful villages packed with stores selling local foods and produce. Keep an eye out for the road side stalls full of fruit, veg, eggs and local honey too.

(9) Place to Live

Although the Suffolk school system is in a state of flux with changes from three tier to two tier education, we still boast wonderful schools and teachers including an abundance of smaller village primaries and great, supportive communities around them. Small towns like Clare, Eye, Framlingham, Beccles, Newmarket, Hadleigh and Woodbridge all really good great facilities and possess community pride with a busy calendar of events and promotions and active business organisations dedicated to protecting independent shops. The larger towns of Ipswich, Lowestoft, Haverhill, Sudbury and Bury St Edmunds have good shopping facilities, leisure centres and improving transport networks; they are vibrant and increasingly multicultural with hard working organisations such as Bid4Bury and local chambers of commerce driving towns forward. Many towns are within one hour of London via rail, routed through Ipswich, Cambridge or Colchester and quite a few villages are connected to the network too.

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The Arc

(10) Places to shop

Great effort has been made to protect the local and the independent and small towns and villages like Clare, Lavenham, Framlingham, Halesworth, Aldeburgh, Woodbridge Sudbury and Hadleigh excel at this- we love shopping in Suffolk. Bury St Edmunds has a large new shopping centre called The Arc but boasts ancient streets of independent shops- St Johns, Risbygate and Abbeygate St alongside one of the UKs best bi-weekly markets. Other markets can be found in many Suffolk towns alongside newer farmers markets – the Snape Maltings market being one of the best. Ipswich boasts the largest shopping centre and winding streets of shops over a larger area although the tiniest of Suffolk villages offer a surprising range of eclectic stores which manage to provide an online ordering service too. Check out our many antiques barns too- Clare, Long Melford and Snape all have them still although they have declined greatly in numbers since the heyday of ‘Lovejoy’, the TV series set in and around the Suffolk antiques trade.

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Ramsholt

 

Go Crabbing!

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Crabbing in Walberswick

Adaptable, succulent and THE taste of an East Anglian Summer, the crab is one of our great local delicacies and also provides children with hours of entertainment along the beaches and jetties of the Suffolk and Norfolk coast. Although the famous Walberwick Crabbing Festival had to be shelved because it grew too popular, it is still an easy and inexpensive way to get close to nature as long as you remember to put the crabs back.

The old Suffolk name for it is babbing, derived from the bab, a weight tied to the end of a line. As dialect expert Charlie Haylock writes in his book, Sloightly On The Huh, “He caught hell ‘n’ all th’uther day when he went a’babbin” and the whole practice has its roots in practicality and the provision of  free food for the family.

The edible crab, or brown crab, (latin name Cancer pagurus), is the most abundant and largest crab you’ll encounter along the Suffolk coastline and they are commonly founf near to our piers, jetties and wharves, hiding under rocky outcrops on beaches and clustered around harbour walls. Crabs need shelter in bad weather and somewhere to escape predators and our seaweed-strewn coastlines is home to plenty of crabs, hastily scurrying away when they are disturbed. The flinty, chalky seabeds of the Norfolk coastline makes for excellent ‘gillying’ (crabbing in the local dialect) because the softness of the seabed literally gives crabs something to get their claws into as they haul themselves along, fighting the strong currents of the North Sea. This Cretaceous chalk underlies the whole Norfolk coast and is permanently visible at West Runton at low tide and it forms the largest chalk reef in European waters, some 25 miles in length. This underwater seascape called the Cromer Shoal Chalk Reef has arches of chalk 3 metres high and gives life and shelter to an amazing array of marine life now has protection after being designated a Marine Conservation Zone. It is here that those famous Cromer Crabs are found.

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Ramsholt

The old jetties of Felixstowe Ferry and Walberswick and the quay next to the Ramsholt Arms Pub are some of the best crabbing spots in Suffolk and Cromer, Wells Next the Sea, Old Hunstanton, the east promenade in Sheringham, and Blakeney Quay are their equivalent in Norfolk. We have heard good reports about the Bridge off Stiffkey Marshes where the shallow brackish tidal water both attracts crabs and is easy to dangle your line into and crabbing under the road bridge at Oulton Broad on the eastward side is productive because it also has salt-water tidal surges. If you want to visit Walberswick to crab, then all you need do is drive along the road past the small triangular village green and the villages oldest pub, the Bell Inn, and you’ll soon arrive at the wooden bridges where generations of us have perched, lines baited with rancid bacon, and then hopped onto the ferry over the River Blyth to Southwold and its pier for more seaside fun.

The best time to crab is on an incoming tide because this is when they naturally come in to feed. At high tide the water can be fairly deep and wharves quite high up – using safety aids such as arm bands or a life jacket might reassure you a little when you see your young children sitting at the edge of a drop into deep water. I have (less than fond) memories of taking twelve adolescent boys from an approved school alongside twelve service users from a rehab facility to crab at Walberswick on the hottest day of the year- a busy afternoon spent constantly head-counting amid the nagging fear that we had lost several off the quay- in fact some of them seemed engaged in a permanent attempt to push each other off when they weren’t smacking their fellow crabbers over the head with stinking, out of date streaky bacon. The return journey home in a mini-bus full of hot, festering teenagers, the air redolent with the smell of crab, bacon, seawater and strawberry ice creams will never leave the memory.

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Crabs aren’t the only marine life you can catch in Norfolk and Suffolk .

Use a crabbing line sold from most seaside shops which is weighted and has the bait tied on at its end- if you are in Blakeney you can buy them at at Stratton Long Marine or at the Blakeney Spar. Don’t use hooks as these are seriously harmful to marine life including birds should you drop them into the sea by accident.You’ll see some crabbers using a fishing net to land their crabs but serious crabbers do frown on this as it gives an unfair advantage and doesn’t reward the dexterous and the patient. The crabs will cling onto the string and bait so be careful pulling the line out of the water when you retrieve them and get them into your bucket (which should be filled with seawater and be spacious- crabs don’t like to be too close to each other). Using smelly bacon rind, squid or sand eels, available from seaside shops and bait shops tends to work the best in our experience. Other devoted crabbers get fish heads from the local fishmongers or swear by frozen sand eels, described as caviar for crabs. When you have finished, carefully release the crabs back into the sea. Don’t keep them for too long and keep the bucket covered too and out of direct sunlight.

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Photo by Alex Mustard 2020 vision

Should you prefer to go rock-pooling instead, the two counties have a plethora of places to choose from and the Norfolk Wildlife Trust runs rock pool rummaging events on West Runton beach (5 miles wets of Cromer) throughout the summer. Shore crabs, beadlet anemones, starfish and squat lobsters are the most commonly encountered species although there are many more. The rock pools at West Runton are on top of an extensive flat platform of chalk which is slippery because of its seaweed covering- the non-agile of foot will usually find themselves slipping and ending up flat on their butt at some point so wear decent footwear. Children who take part in rock pooling can also get involved in fossil finding, and these sessions not only help children to understand the natural world around them, but also how their actions affect wildlife and habitats. The striated cliffs of Old Hunstanton where multiple layers of sandstone and carr-stone have formed a wonderful habitat studded with fossils and rock pools are another prime location for exploring the hidden world of rock pools. The pools  that form between the groynes on the beach by the Lifeboat House in Wells allows you to catch a good size crab or two, even at high tide, and solves the problem of toddlers teetering on the edge of a high jetty.

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We couldn’t end this feature without adding one of our favourite recipes featuring crab- Grilled Crabs from Cromer with Parmesan and Heat. Cromer crabs can be brought from fishmongers all over the region plus Bury St Edmunds market and Mummeries fish stall on Diss market too.

Grilled Cromer Crabs with Parmesan and Heat

  • shallot (finely chopped)
  • 1 clove garlic (crushed)
  • 1 tsp salted butter
  • browning
  • 50 ml sherry
  • 1 in shells
  • 1 Cromer crab
  • 1 handful chopped parsley (finely)
  • 1 handful breadcrumbs (fresh)
  • pinch of chile powder or cayenne
  • 1 handful parmesan cheese

1. Gently fry the shallot and garlic in butter until softened. Pour in the sherry and bring to a simmer.

2. Add the crab meat, reserving the shell. Stir in the chile/cayenne then warm through for 4-5 minutes then stir in the parsley.

3. Spoon the mixture back into the crab shell. Sprinkle the top with breadcrumbs and grate over a little parmesan and add a grind of black pepper. Place a few dots of butter on top.

4. Put under a hot grill for 1-2 minutes to crisp the bread and melt the cheese. Serve with hot toast.


 

 

 

 

Woodbridge Tide Mill and The Cake Shop Launch Collaborative Cookbook

Woodbridge’s iconic working Tide Mill has collaborated with the town’s much loved bakery, The Cake Shop, to create an informative book filled with delicious recipes and fascinating facts.

The book will launch at The Local Seasonal Food Market: What’s Tasty in Woodbridge on Market Hill in Woodbridge on Saturday 24th May from 10am.  The recipes have been created by Christine Wright from The Cake Shop and Anne Barratt from the Tide Mill – who will be signing copies of the book at the market between 12 noon and 1.00pm.

The book uses interesting recipes and facts to dispel the myths around wholemeal flour.   Not only does it explain why wholemeal flour is the healthiest option, but it also demonstrates the remarkable versatility of wholemeal flour through the variety of tasty recipes.

Nigel Barratt, Miller and Trustee of the Tide Mill Living Museum said; “Many people may think that that all you can really do with wholemeal flour is bake heavy, stodgy bread, but it’s far more versatile.

“Most flour produced in modern roller mills has all the bran and most of the nutrients in the wheat germ removed in the process.  Our stone ground wholemeal flour uses 100% of the whole grain. The slow and gentle milling process leaves all the goodness in the flour and makes it the healthiest and most natural of all wheat flours. It’s tasty too, with a characteristic nutty flavour that works really well in bread, cakes, pastry and biscuits!”

We have been able to see a sneak preview of the recipes and they appear accessible, family friendly and clearly explained. Tide Mill Wholemeal Onion & Herb Bread, Chapatti’s and Paratha’s are all accompanied by bakers tips to help you trouble shoot any problem areas and teach you some of the tricks of the trade too. In the meal section, Stuffed Mushrooms on Tide Mill Croutons offers what looks like a delicious and sensible way of using up any stale bread. Unlike supermarket bread which is stuffed with preservatives which tends to make it get soggy and mouldy as it ages, home baked bread merely dries out. This offers great scope for further cooking, an important consideration in these times of austerity and furthermore ingredients are in the main, accessible and affordable.

Bread can also make great puddings and it won’t be long before we are into the fruit season and able to make the delicious sounding Blueberry & Nectarine Crumble with its lime spiked fruit base and almond enriched crumble topping. Cakes also celebrate fruit from the recipe for Christines fruit cake through all manner of banana breads, Date Slices and the Tide Mill Carrot Cake. Sections for recipes suitable for children- pizza bases for one and even a dog biscuit recipe round off this useful and local cook book.

The East Coast Diner in Woodbridge – Reviewed

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We visited just after Christmas on a frigidly cold afternoon and walked in to a decidedly un-frigid welcome- friendly and enthusiastic. The vibe is NYC diner in an old building minus the trad Brooklyn pressed tin roof yet there is nothing staged about this place. 

The choice offered on the menu is not overwhelming, seemingly predicated upon the catering principle of offering less and doing it better. (The best indication of freshly cooked food being a small menu anyway.)

The hotdogs and burger meat come from highly regarded local sources, the chile relish is from the local Black Dog Deli and all food appears to be freshly prepped and cooked to order. 

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We chose some pretty authentic sounding pure beef hot dogs (The Pimp Steak) w/ sauerkraut, onions, chile relish, mustard and skinny fries. There are optional extra toppings and few limits on customisation other than the size of your mouth when trying to fit the hot dog into it. The burgers come with the best type of bun- a Brioche, lightly grilled with salad, pickles and cheese spilling out from underneath. The fries are the crunchy skinny type (in size only) and can be ordered with blue cheese, Cajun spices or Howlin’ Hot chile. We wimped out and had them straight up. 


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Sadly having to drive home meant we had to bypass the decadent sounding ‘Hard Shake’, a malted milkshake with shots of Kahlua, coconut rum and golden rum. We also had to bypass the seductive cocktail menu full of variations on a Mojito, Margarita and Martini theme. A range of craft beers are sold too including ‘Thunderstruck’ from local brewery Hellhound in Hadleigh, Suffolk and the incredibly popular Brooklyn Beer. There are juices, sodas and some voluptuous sounding malted shakes- millionaires shortbread and the more usual vanilla, chocolate and strawberry made with malted milk and dairy ice cream. You can go left field with these with an added shot of Nutella or Banana.

East Coast Diner also has a fine range of pizzas with toppings both usual and less so.  We have never had a Pizza with walnut, beetroot and Binham Blue cheese but are going back to have one washed down with a Bumbleberry Slushie style Froz-Z-zen. We haven’t seen the Bumbleberry mentioned outside the West coast of the USA before and only heard about it because Pascale Le Draoulec mentioned it in her road food book ‘American Pie.’