The new nature writing- we review ‘Doubling Back’ by Linda Cracknell

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We love the evolving genre of British nature writing and the fact that new kids on the block are not throwing the baby out with the bathwater as they create fresh narratives. Robert MacFarlane. Richard Mabey, Roger Deakin and Katharine Harris- these are all references in spirit and style in this exquisitely written and designed book.

 ‘Of all the current crop of excellent “new Nature Writers” Linda Cracknell is probably the most physically present to the reader.  These are real walks, walked by a real (and clever) writer; and the interesting things she tells us about feel real to the action of walking.”Sara Maitland

Doubling Back is a fascinating and moving account of walking in the footsteps of others. In 1952 Linda Cracknell’s father embarked on a hike through the Swiss Alps. Fifty years later Linda retraces that fateful journey, following the trail of the man she barely knew. This collection of walking tales takes its theme from that pilgrimage. The walks trace the contours of history, following writers, relations and retreading ways across mountains, valleys and coasts formerly trodden by drovers, saints and adventurers. Each walk is about the reaffirming of memories, beliefs and emotions, and especially of the connection that one can have with the past through particular places. This book celebrates life, family, friendship and walking through landscapes richly textured with stories.

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The river Spey near Newtonnmore

Our favourite? Linda’s walk from the tiny Speyside village of Newtonnmore up into the nearby Cairngorms along Minigaig Pass used by drovers to avoid the easier toll paying roads nearby. The other ancient route, Coymns Road, started from the bend near Ruthven Barracks also heading for Blair Atholl. Of these two, the Minigaig was the main route to the south, falling out of favour when a party of soldiers froze to death on the route during a winter storm but remained in use until well after Wades Military Road was built. Our own memories of a teenage skiing trip and a stay in a lodge at Newtonmore: the midges, burns, local Speyside distillery and an ill fated crush on our ski instructor Denis melded perfectly with Cracknell’s narrative, neither detracting from each other.

The deliberately accidental and surprise filled psychogeography of our youth has yielded to the path chosen for travel simply because it is is the path most travelled. What we value most about this exciting form of  nature/travel writing is its ability to transport us right back to that time when getting there was not the primary purpose of a journey. That’s not to say that the end point was or is not important; whether this be emotionally or practically, but somehow the ability to have still points on the way; to notice, see, hear and feel got lost.

 

 

 

 

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