Some more cookbooks for your shelves

We’ve had some lovely new cook books sent to us for perusal and these stood out the most, for content, design and brilliance of the recipes and writing. We hope you like them and order your copy from a local book seller. Where the book is yet to be published, we have indicated date of publication.

Home cooking by Laurie Colwin.

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Laurie Colwin died far too young in 1992, aged 48 and this re-packaged book, packed with recipes was the first of her food writing to be published in the USA where she is far better known, although her status among food writers and cooks is cemented- Nigella Lawson adores her. I first read it in my mid twenties when I had my own grown up kitchen and an American friend sent it to me as encouragement to cook. Suffused with love for her little daughter and a source of friendly advice with a familiar tone for the rest of us, this is, for me, the book to read when you feel in need of something other than a list of ingredients and what to do with them.

 “I love to eat out, but even more, I love to eat in.” said Colwin who published a few novels before beginning her (more) successful career in food writing that did not then have the status or respect it now does. Colwin excels in keeping the kitchen at the heart of the home whilst never slipping into a sub feminist subtext of ‘this is where you always belonged, you know’. An arch intelligence and wry, often self deprecating humour pervades her writing. You so want to be at her dinner parties whether they be plate on lap on a bed in a miniscule New York City apartment or something more formal. We can laugh at our culinary disasters because Colwin does at hers and lets us learn from them.

Never focused inwards, Colwin writes of the people she meets and the food they bring into her life- we meet her daughters babysitter from St Vincent who inducts her into the pleasures of Black Cake: “There was only a tiny scrap of the slice left and I was forced to share it with my child who said ‘More!’ in a loud voice” and also inducted me.  Her Black Cake has been our Christmas cake ever since. From dates and bosses to her husband and family, Colwin gives credit where credit is due and intersperses recipes and cooking tips with funny stories and winsome encounters against the backdrop of New York City.

Chapters are titled ‘How to fry Chicken’, ‘Bread Baking Without Agony’ and ‘Repulsive Dinners: a Memoir’. In the latter, Colwin talks of the triumph of a truly repellent meal and rejects her mothers advice that appalling cooks should live on filet mignon and have an excellent bakery on speed dial because “the rich complicated tapestry that is the human experience would be the poorer for it.” and she is right. She goes on to describe a casserole without fragrance as the lid is lifted to reveal partially cooked sausages, rice and pineapple rings in a sea of unidentifiable liquid. Beginner cooks are comforted by the fact that it is probably impossible to be that bad.

Yes the book is of its time and some of her advice shows that. We can now source good free range chickens and we don’t see the fondue as anything other than a retro delight. BUT the emotions that underpin her writing are timeless and universal. I love her.

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The Bloomsbury Cookbook

‘The Bloomsbury Cook Book- recipes for life, love and art’ by Jans Ondaatje Rolls

A book that is art, social history and cook book, feeding the mind alongside the body. With over 170 recipes from members of the Bloomsbury Group, including David and Angela Garnett, Helen Anrep and Frances Partridge and  illustrated with hundreds of paintings, sketches, quotations and photographs, it  is a window onto Bloomsbury via recipes, grocery lists, pantries, kitchens and, above all, its dining tables. We loved this book.

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The Bloomsbury Group fostered a fresh, creative and vital way of living that encouraged debate and communication (‘only connect’), as often as not across the dining table. Gathered at these tables were many of the most important figures in art, literature, politics and economics of the modern era: E. M. Forster, Roger Fry, John Maynard Keynes, Lytton Strachey, Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf, among many others.

The author, Jans Ondaatje Rolls invites us to dine with these enduringly fascinating individuals, taking us into the very centre of their world through the meals around which they argued, debated, laughed and loved. From the gastronomically prosaic- Leonard Woolf’s banana and fruit cake sent to him upon the occasion of his birthday by his mother, and his own recipe for haddock based fried fish and chips to the Glyndebourne ham roasted with orange juice, honey and carrots that they prepared for their pre opera feast in the grounds of this most august of British events, the recipes will both surprise and confirm our carefully held assumptions. There are intimate and astonishingly detailed portrait of the group, conjuring up the scents, colours and textures of breakfasts at Monk’s House, lunches at Charleston, tea in Tidmarsh, evening parties in Gordon Square and dinners in the south of France.

Beautifully illustrated, including original artwork by Cressida Bell, this is both a source of inspiration for the modern chef and a unique celebration of life, love and art at the heart of Bloomsbury.

‘Frites’ by Anna De La Forest

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The middle classes like to ‘slum it’, eating what they see as ‘working class foodstuffs’- chips, bacon sandwiches, cheese on toast and stews but cannot help meddling with them, ramping them up with high value ingredients, artisan this, foraged that until they are but a faint shadow of themselves. Is this book on chips (Frites) by Anna De La Forest yet another example of that?  We profess to a guilty love of fast food, the hot dogs and burgers, the chips and kebabs but wouldn’t want to to be caught at the roadside burger van unless it is parked under the arches at Waterloo serving haute dogs at ten quid a throw next to a sandwich board naming the farmer who supplied the pork. Unlike the Right Honourable John Gummer, we don’t feed mechanically recovered meat products to our children.

Chips are a universal indicator of Britishness despite their origins being most definitely not British one bit. Stories abound –  a 1781 family manuscript recounting the deep frying of potatoes prior to 1680 in what was then theSpanish Netherlands (present-day Belgium), in the Meuse valley or the enduring belief that french fries were invented by street vendors on the Pont Neuf bridge in Paris in 1789, just before the outbreak of the French revolution. What is clear is that  deep-fried fish was first introduced into Britain during the 16th century by Jewish refugees from Portugal and Spain and is derived from pescado frito. In 1860, the first fish and chip shop was opened in London by Joseph Malin.

Still, we digress-  all manner of people enjoy frites/chips but where they start to distinguish themselves is in the manner of their preparation and source of ingredients. No longer happy to eat them from newspaper or trays, from cardboard boxes supplied with tongue drying wooden forks to hunt and peck, we are triple frying, thick and super skinny-ing them, experimenting with frying a myriad of other vegetables and fruits and even coating the frites in all manner of odd ingredients. Much of this is driven by the new breed of celebrity cooks and chefs, all driven by a desperate need to stand out from the herd and develop that one signature dish that will give them a fast track to a feature in David Chang’s gastro magazine ‘Lucky Peach‘ and queues of bearded hipsters out the door.

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Very posh and skinny frites

Anne de la Forest, a French cook and food journalist has written a book that heralds and celebrates a trend for frites of many colours. Her book is divided into sections and starts with a handy guide to potatoes (the best types), how to prepare them via peeling, soaking and even the ways in which one might cut them. Seguing into recipe sections which were beautifully illustrated- Trendy Frites, including skinny chips; Creative Frites: made with assorted veg such as sweet potato; and Sweet Frites: desserts made from apples, bananas and pears, sliced into oblongs and deep-fried, we ended up liking the black radish and oregano and caramel and honey glazed variations the best. We were intrigued by the fried feta frites that were thickly coated in breadcrumbs although we cannot imagine what the state of the oil would be afterwards.

‘Bread, Cake, Doughnut, Pudding: Recipes from Britain’s Best Baker’ by Justin Gellatly

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We’re not clear who decided that Gellatly is Britain’s best baker.  After twelve years as Head Baker and Pastry Chef at London foodie institution St John- alma mater of every architect, hipster and would be’s of the same, he found his new home in Borough Market, as co-founder of the Bread Ahead bakery and cookery school. Food fiends go on pilgrimage to Bread Ahead for artisan bread, cakes and Justin’s doughnuts, which sell out as fast as he can make them.

Justin shares his doughnut recipe, along with over 100 others, in his brand new recipe book,Bread, Cake, Doughnut, Pudding. A useful new guide for bakers, traditional recipes and techniques including madeleines, croquembouche and sourdough bread – and the inventive. including Justin’s signature salted caramel custard doughnuts and fennel blossom ice cream make harmonious bedfellows  all in one volume. Like all chefs, Justin cannot resist reinventing the wheel and his versions are not necessarily better; they are just different and add a modern edge that is intriguing and an alternative to the original recipes, not replacements. From the trad Poor Knights of Windsor to a even trad-er Syllabub made with the less usual Cider we found the instructions had clarity and the twists made sense- none of the ‘just because you can, doesn’t mean you should’ nonsense that has turned great chefs like Heston Blumnethal into parodies of themselves. We particularly liked the Apple and Calvados Cake with ‘Mist’, so named because before taking to table, Gellatly would spray it with Calvados. This version is a serve alongside sauce although there’s nothing to stop you spraying it too and we suspect bearded earnest hipster cooks will be doing just that in the hope that some of that Gellatly magic rubs off on them.

Blue Plate Special by Kate Christansen

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A literary memoir by novelist Kate Christensen in which food, (eating, cooking, thinking about it) is used as a vehicle to drive the story of her life. In the classic manner of a Laurie Colwin or M.F.K Fisher, the authors narrative becomes a way of re-examining and telling a life, starting with her unconventional childhood as the daughter of a Berkeley legal activist who ruled the house with “an iron fist” through diets, the world of men, travel and adult life writing books.

Beautifully designed with a hipster- in-mind cover, the writing is easy, intelligent and rammed with gastronomic jumping off points for readers- we were sent into reveries of our our foodie pasts on nearly every page.

Rosewater and Orange Blossoms by Maureen Abood

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Growing up a Lebanese-American means Maureen Abood gets to take the lush and exotic flavours of her Lebanese past and meld them with the stories of her adult life in Harbor Springs, Michigan in first a blog and now this book. The list of ingredients in her recipes alone will make your head swoon- pomegranates and sweetly scented sherberts, pistachios, flower waters, citrus sharp spices infusing meat, fish and vegetables. They are incorporated into mouthwatering meals:  thick yogurt in olive oil, lamb with spices and herbs, warm dates, pomegranate and rose sorbet…

Maureen takes us through the recipes and meals she was brought up with, paying tribute to the generations of her family through the retelling of their stories. That focus on ingredients means readers are gently encouraged to take a seasonal approach and to use what is local when possible. There is nothing provincial here though and Maureens culinary school training will ensure that you remain grounded in technique whilst your imagination and taste buds soar.

1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die by Mimi Sheraton

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Mimi Sheraton—award-winning cookbook author, grande dame of food journalism, and former restaurant critic for The New York Times jumps on the perennially popular theme of the book of lists and whilst this breaks no new ground, it is an amusing enough and swift read for those who like to aggregate themselves against other food lovers.

1,000 Foods selects some of the best cuisines around the world (French, Italian, Chinese, Senegalese, Lebanese, Mongolian, Peruvian) and from there homes in on rhe tastes, ingredients, dishes, and restaurants that every reader should experience and dream about, whether it’s dinner at Chicago’s Alinea or the perfect empanada. In more than 1,000 pages and over 550 full-color photographs, it celebrates haute and snack, comforting and exotic, hyper-local and the universally enjoyed: a Tuscan plate of Fritto Misto. Saffron Buns for breakfast in downtown Stockholm. Bird’s Nest Soup. A frozen Milky Way. Black truffles from Le Périgord.

Mimi Sheraton has an opinion and no fear of sharing it, reinforced by her 6 decade pedigree of professional gustatory critiquing and her book ranges from continent to continent identifying dishes, restaurants and experiences in each place- those considered by her to be seminal. She is no snob though.Bon Appetempts by Amelia Morris Take the Canadian and American section with their everywoman focus landing on frozen Milky Ways, southern Ambrosia and MoonPies (also from the Deep South), the former “an ecstatic rush of contrasts’ from the childhood memories of this New Yorker and the latter from trips away from the frozen north. Mimi does icons and nostalgia the best and they come together in a glorious paen to the Oyster Bar in Grand Central Station: “The famed oyster stew (oysters poached in cream and butter) is a thin, milky, slurp-worthy delight. The oyster pan roast is thicker, the aforementioned ingredients spiked with hot paprika and chile sauce and lovingly ladled, usually by a hassled yet generous waiter, over a slice of good toast. They’re dishes that work thanks to the juxtaposition of the oysters’ sharp sea saltiness with the milk’s neutrality.”

Bon Appetempts by Amelia Morris

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When Amelia Morris found a beautiful chocolate cake in Bon Appétit and took the recipe home to recreate it for a Christmas day brunch she was hosting, it collapsed into a terrible (but delicious) mess that had to be served in an oversized bowl. It also paralleled the interesting and never-quite-predictable, situations she’s gotten herself into throughout her life, from her one-day career as a six-year-old lady wrestler to her ill-fated job at the School of Rock in Los Angeles. As she gets older, the kitchen is where she finds that even if some of her attempts fall short of the standard set by a food magazine, they can still bring satisfaction to her and her family and friends. Full of witty and snarky observations about food, family, unemployment, romance, and the excesses of modern L.A., and incorporating recipes as basic as Toasted Cheerios and as advanced as gâteau de crêpe, Amelia’s book is sure to ring bells with those of us who try really hard and do not always succeed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Go Crabbing!

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Crabbing in Walberswick

Adaptable, succulent and THE taste of an East Anglian Summer, the crab is one of our great local delicacies and also provides children with hours of entertainment along the beaches and jetties of the Suffolk and Norfolk coast. Although the famous Walberwick Crabbing Festival had to be shelved because it grew too popular, it is still an easy and inexpensive way to get close to nature as long as you remember to put the crabs back.

The old Suffolk name for it is babbing, derived from the bab, a weight tied to the end of a line. As dialect expert Charlie Haylock writes in his book, Sloightly On The Huh, “He caught hell ‘n’ all th’uther day when he went a’babbin” and the whole practice has its roots in practicality and the provision of  free food for the family.

The edible crab, or brown crab, (latin name Cancer pagurus), is the most abundant and largest crab you’ll encounter along the Suffolk coastline and they are commonly founf near to our piers, jetties and wharves, hiding under rocky outcrops on beaches and clustered around harbour walls. Crabs need shelter in bad weather and somewhere to escape predators and our seaweed-strewn coastlines is home to plenty of crabs, hastily scurrying away when they are disturbed. The flinty, chalky seabeds of the Norfolk coastline makes for excellent ‘gillying’ (crabbing in the local dialect) because the softness of the seabed literally gives crabs something to get their claws into as they haul themselves along, fighting the strong currents of the North Sea. This Cretaceous chalk underlies the whole Norfolk coast and is permanently visible at West Runton at low tide and it forms the largest chalk reef in European waters, some 25 miles in length. This underwater seascape called the Cromer Shoal Chalk Reef has arches of chalk 3 metres high and gives life and shelter to an amazing array of marine life now has protection after being designated a Marine Conservation Zone. It is here that those famous Cromer Crabs are found.

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Ramsholt 

The old jetties of Felixstowe Ferry and Walberswick and the quay next to the Ramsholt Arms Pub are some of the best crabbing spots in Suffolk and Cromer, Wells Next the Sea, Old Hunstanton, the east promenade in Sheringham, and Blakeney Quay are their equivalent in Norfolk. We have heard good reports about the Bridge off Stiffkey Marshes where the shallow brackish tidal water both attracts crabs and is easy to dangle your line into and crabbing under the road bridge at Oulton Broad on the eastward side is productive because it also has salt-water tidal surges. If you want to visit Walberswick to crab, then all you need do is drive along the road past the small triangular village green and the villages oldest pub, the Bell Inn, and you’ll soon arrive at the wooden bridges where generations of us have perched, lines baited with rancid bacon, and then hopped onto the ferry over the River Blyth to Southwold and its pier for more seaside fun.

The best time to crab is on an incoming tide because this is when they naturally come in to feed. At high tide the water can be fairly deep and wharves quite high up – using safety aids such as arm bands or a life jacket might reassure you a little when you see your young children sitting at the edge of a drop into deep water. I have (less than fond) memories of taking twelve adolescent boys from an approved school alongside twelve service users from a rehab facility to crab at Walberswick on the hottest day of the year- a busy afternoon spent constantly head-counting amid the nagging fear that we had lost several off the quay- in fact some of them seemed engaged in a permanent attempt to push each other off when they weren’t smacking their fellow crabbers over the head with stinking, out of date streaky bacon. The return journey home in a mini-bus full of hot, festering teenagers, the air redolent with the smell of crab, bacon, seawater and strawberry ice creams will never leave the memory.

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Crabs aren’t the only marine life you can catch in Norfolk and Suffolk .

Use a crabbing line sold from most seaside shops which is weighted and has the bait tied on at its end- if you are in Blakeney you can buy them at at Stratton Long Marine or at the Blakeney Spar. Don’t use hooks as these are seriously harmful to marine life including birds should you drop them into the sea by accident.You’ll see some crabbers using a fishing net to land their crabs but serious crabbers do frown on this as it gives an unfair advantage and doesn’t reward the dexterous and the patient. The crabs will cling onto the string and bait so be careful pulling the line out of the water when you retrieve them and get them into your bucket (which should be filled with seawater and be spacious- crabs don’t like to be too close to each other). Using smelly bacon rind, squid or sand eels, available from seaside shops and bait shops tends to work the best in our experience. Other devoted crabbers get fish heads from the local fishmongers or swear by frozen sand eels, described as caviar for crabs. When you have finished, carefully release the crabs back into the sea. Don’t keep them for too long and keep the bucket covered too and out of direct sunlight.

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Photo by Alex Mustard 2020 vision

Should you prefer to go rock-pooling instead, the two counties have a plethora of places to choose from and the Norfolk Wildlife Trust runs rock pool rummaging events on West Runton beach (5 miles wets of Cromer) throughout the summer. Shore crabs, beadlet anemones, starfish and squat lobsters are the most commonly encountered species although there are many more. The rock pools at West Runton are on top of an extensive flat platform of chalk which is slippery because of its seaweed covering- the non-agile of foot will usually find themselves slipping and ending up flat on their butt at some point so wear decent footwear. Children who take part in rock pooling can also get involved in fossil finding, and these sessions not only help children to understand the natural world around them, but also how their actions affect wildlife and habitats. The striated cliffs of Old Hunstanton where multiple layers of sandstone and carr-stone have formed a wonderful habitat studded with fossils and rock pools are another prime location for exploring the hidden world of rock pools. The pools  that form between the groynes on the beach by the Lifeboat House in Wells allows you to catch a good size crab or two, even at high tide, and solves the problem of toddlers teetering on the edge of a high jetty.

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We couldn’t end this feature without adding one of our favourite recipes featuring crab- Grilled Crabs from Cromer with Parmesan and Heat. Cromer crabs can be brought from fishmongers all over the region plus Bury St Edmunds market and Mummeries fish stall on Diss market too.

Grilled Cromer Crabs with Parmesan and Heat

  • shallot (finely chopped)
  • 1 clove garlic (crushed)
  • 1 tsp salted butter
  • browning
  • 50 ml sherry
  • 1 in shells
  • 1 Cromer crab
  • 1 handful chopped parsley (finely)
  • 1 handful breadcrumbs (fresh)
  • pinch of chile powder or cayenne
  • 1 handful parmesan cheese

1. Gently fry the shallot and garlic in butter until softened. Pour in the sherry and bring to a simmer.

2. Add the crab meat, reserving the shell. Stir in the chile/cayenne then warm through for 4-5 minutes then stir in the parsley.

3. Spoon the mixture back into the crab shell. Sprinkle the top with breadcrumbs and grate over a little parmesan and add a grind of black pepper. Place a few dots of butter on top.

4. Put under a hot grill for 1-2 minutes to crisp the bread and melt the cheese. Serve with hot toast.


 

 

 

 

The Crown & Castle in Orford – We review.

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The frontage of the Crown & Castle

We have stayed at The Crown & Castle on three separate occasions in rooms across the tariffs- from the dog friendly garden rooms to prime rooms overlooking Orford Castle (dreamy and romantic) and have yet to be disappointed. The dog friendly rooms do not smell of dog either -something that concerned us when we had to be moved there one night. The hotel is friendly to them though, even providing a pre-bookable doggy table in the restaurant area.- something you need to consider if you detest canine company. Children are welcomed of any age in the restaurant at lunchtime and those over 8 years old in the hotel and at dinner time so please be aware of this as some guests have and do complain. Car parking can be an issue when the hotel is full as they state they are two places short and therefore some guests may have to park in the (very) nearby village.

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The rooms are beautifully decorated and it is clear that the co-owner, Ruth Watson has taken full charge of how they look sourcing quirky and good quality furnishings and fittings. Every room has an individuality that pleases. As Ruth herself says “We are neither a country house hotel in the ruched-curtain, prohibitively expensive sense, nor a boutique hotel where  cutting-edge design precludes hospitality – or functionality. Our aim is to offer a relaxing atmosphere with thoughtful, smiling service; interesting food with a British and authentic Italian bias; and simple but comfortable bedrooms with good beds. Orford itself does the rest.”

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Garden room

The stuffed cat on the chair in the entrance lobby amazed me with its placid nature, not paying a blind bit of notice to what went on. It took me two days to realise that this was because it was dead-sharp on the uptake I am. It is this kind of oddity (a lovely oddity) that endears this place to us.

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Trinity Restaurant

Richly furnished, comfortable and warm to the degree that getting up to go anywhere or do anything became (a bit of a first world) problem, we played scrabble in the bar snug in front of the open fire and then went into the adjacent dining area to eat very well. Ruth Watson is a food writer (two Glenfiddich awards) and author of ‘The Really Helpful Cookbook’, ‘Fat Girl Slim’ and ‘Something for the Weekend’ so she is not going to serve mediocre ‘Maison de la Casa House’ style food.  The menu is a riff off contemporary British with that twist of mainland European technique and influence that you so often see. Touches of other cultures could be seen- SE Asian or North African flavours but all the ingredients were local, seasonal and fresh. Chicken comes from Sutton Hoo chickens, the Butley Orford Oysterage supplies all manner of cured and fresh fish and juices from High House Fruits among many many other local suppliers.

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Orford Castle

Orford is a foodies paradise (we hate that term but it does fit) and every which way you turn you will be smacked in the (metaphorical) nose with good things to eat. The Bear Claws from the Pump Street Bakery are a good place to start!  The local shops are independent and speciality from the famous Pump Street Bakery and Orford Pinneys cafe with attached Butley Orford Oysterage to the Suffolk Butcher. There are great pubs, the castle and Orford Ness to visit plus the entire Heritage Suffolk Coastline and the countryside villages to peruse.

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Orford Ness

Nothing about the Crown & Castle is overblown. The place is pitch perfect and if the accommodation prices are a bit on the higher side, they do offer frequent seasonal deals and it is worth keeping a close eye out for these. We highly recommend saving up for a special treat or coming here for lunch or dinner if a stay is out of the question. The team are so accommodating that if you tell them at time of booking that it is a special occasion, they’ll go that extra mile to make it special for you.

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Looking out over Orford Ness

 

Mumsnet Recommends- Yes, we really do buy the stuff we see mentioned on Mumsnet!

This article by Mumsnet Lancashire- Em Hill, caught our eye. Read the original here.

79% Of Mumsnetters buy a product after reading about it on Mumsnet

 I find these figures fascinating: 79% of Mumsnetters read about a product on Mumsnet then go on to buy it and; 80% of users seek advice or read reviews on Mumsnet when they are planning to buy a child-related product and this got me thinking – what have I bought after reading about on Mumsnet?

(Stats are from an independent study of on-line parenting forums for the Arts and Humanities Research Council).
Karcher steam cleaner- something else I applied for-a product test. I got one, added my feedback, following the feedback thread avidly to read about the experiences of the other testers. It does a fabulous job especially on tiles- my kitchen wall tiles shone like when they were new and it wasn’t an easy task due to their uneven nature and polished finish. Getting rid of soap scum on the shower screen, bathroom tiles and bath was a doddle although I did end up with a bright red post sauna facial look- not attractive one bit. Not one bit. Attacking the stone kitchen floor eradicated its sticky residue yet I missed the smell of cleaning products (why? I do not know – they are all chemical) and the size of the steam cleaner (I am five foot one)  combined with the fact I always seem to manage to steam myself (it really hurts) means it is used for spring and pre-Christmas cleaning. It would come in handy should a burglar wander up the stairs in the middle of the night though. He/she will be despatched with great clouds of super hero steam as I stand at the top of the stairs brandishing my yellow mean steam machine.
Then there are the shoes I may have bought in several colours (Sophia Webster’s dancing shoes, Boden silver slingbacks, Jimmy Choo degrade yellow & black stiletto- oops) ; the great bra intervention threads, and the Waitrose pea & Asparagus risotto which provides fast tasty comfort food. It resides in the freezer and you can use as much or as little as you want. So when you have planned a meal for 4 and suddenly it’s only 2 people or 2 extra people arrive it’s my easy back up plan and I delight in sharing this with you all. Shirley Conran said ‘Life’s too short to stuff a mushroom’ but it is never so short that a trip to Waitrose or its online emporium cannot be fitted in.
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Steamcream Lavender scented loveliness with all natural ingredients in tins that are so utterly gorgeous in their design, I might have bought rather a lot of them. This multi use cream works wonders, lasts ages and has a Willy Wonka level of marshmallowy-whipped loveliness. Suffolk people can find it at Blue Dog in Clare. It is around £20 a pot but it lasts for ages and the empty pots make great containers for earrings, other creams and plectrums.
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Lotus biscuit spread started a rash of threads on Mumsnet resulting in this guide to making an absolute pig of ourselves. This work of the gastro devil is basically Lotus (aka Speculoos) biscuits turned into a soft spreadable goo. Available in crunchy or smooth, we like it stirred into ice cream for a fast track to type 2. We’ve never been ones to do anything slow.
images (11)Laura Santini Taste No #5- I might have been responsible for introducing this to many, many Mumsnetters as it has become indispensable in our house for those times when we lack the time to cook down a sofritto or flavour stews ad nauseum. This blend of everything Umami in a tube, all fresh olives, anchovies, parmesan, tomatoes and porcini now comes in other flavours. Nobu collaborated on a south east Asian version, there is La Bomba, a concentrated tomato paste and a new Umami dust flavour powder. Spread it on fish, meat and vegetables, add it as you cook down, smear it on crostini, use it in pies, tarts etc. The scope is limitless and the packaging is super cool with those aluminium look tubes.
downloadCarmex lip balm is another old timer favourite, discovered in the USA twenty years ago by myself and bought back by the shed load. It is now easily available in the super cute little tin and a squeezy tube. I adore this so much that I receive it in my Christmas stocking every year and have a tin in each handbag, every room of the house and in the cars. The slightly medicinal scent and gloopy texture means it feels pharmaceutical rather then beauty-glossy which I prefer. Cost wise? It’s less than £2 a tube or tin and lasts aeons and also comes in limited edition scents and tin designs.
images (11)Lanolips Banana Balm and the whole Lanolips range really. If you are a packaging junkie like I am and you can cope with the super kitsch and super cute, this range is for you. Saturated with lanolin, incredibly enriching, beautifully scented (you aren’t left smelling like a sheep left out in the rain) and portable, I have been accumulating these lovely products for the last few years. Not the most inexpensive- a lip balm will set you back about £8 but they do last.
downloadFootner– The live Footner thread on Mumsnet is manna from heaven if you are a sporner (don’t ask) with Mumsnetters testing the footner gel sock live and posting graphic photos as the bottom of their feet dehisced. Basically you put on the sock after applying a gel based on lactic acid that eats the dry horny layer of skin on the soles of your feet. A few days later, your foot simply degloves with shards of epidermis hanging off like Miss Haversham’s moth eaten curtains. There are hundreds of abscess bursting, spot picking Sporner threads on Mumsnet- the Klaxon sounded the loudest on these.
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Saltwater Sandals – these are so cool in that old skool going-to-school manner and less ubiquitous than Swedish Has Beens (which I also have). Available in tons of colours and some gorgeous florals,  Like Henry Kelly, I have gone for gold here in a nod to this seasons obsession with metallics. They are comfortable, I will be doing Latitude in them, paddling in the sea in them and generally bumping along in a good old Suffolk summer. If your feet are comfortable (and stylish) then everything else is. They are like Botox for your soul – they will stop you from frowning with discomfort.
Thanks Mumsnet for increasing my list of items I didn’t know I needed, for talking me into the best buys and warning me against the worst buys too. I will add to this feature as I (no doubt) buy more!
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Ten reasons to …..visit…. Felixstowe

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The town of Felixstowe curves along the beach

Often neglected in favour of its Suffolk cousins with better PR, Aldeburgh and Southwold, we think Felixstowe is a great place to spend time in, full of interesting family attractions and things to do. Good transport links with its location at the end of the A14, just past Ipswich makes it easy to get to and the safe, clean beaches, both in the town centre and at Old Felixstowe means that there is still fun to be had even if your budget is limited. Bring your bathing suit in the summer or wrap up warm for a colder weather bracing walk along the seafront with its broad buggy friendly promenade and warm your hands up with a tray of hot freshly fried fish and chips. Here’s our round up of the best things to do, some suggested by our followers on Twitter and others chosen by us. Do let us know if we have left your favourites out.

(1) Watching the Ships

By Rodney Harris from Geograph/ Creative Commons
By Rodney Harris from Geograph/ Creative Commons

The Port of Felixstowe Suffolk enjoys a unique position, perched on a peninsula between the rivers Orwell and Deben and is the United Kingdom’s busiest container port, dealing with over 40% of Britain’s containerised trade. The Port’s newer Trinity Terminal has 26 quayside cranes and spans over 2 km. along one of Europe’s longest continuous quays and is able to accommodate the latest generation of large container ships. The Port’s Landguard Terminal came into operation in July 1967 as the first deep-water facility for container ships serving the UK.

But enough of the stats- to a child (and many adults) this means really big ships, lots of clanking noises, wheeling seagulls and an amazing and dramatic floodlit night time light spectacle. The John Bradfield Viewing Area adjoining Landguard Terminal was provided by the Port in 1992 and has become one of the most popular places for local people and visitors alike along the Suffolk Coast. Whether you sit and eat in the View Point Cafe (inside the viewing area) which serves all day breakfasts, fresh fish and chips, cakes, ice creams, and a full selection of teas and coffees or outside, the fantastic close up views of one of the world’s busiest ports are a shipspotter’s heaven. From the John Bradfield Viewing Area you can enjoy mesmerising views across the estuary to the Shotley Peninsula and the towns of Harwich and Dovercourt (both in Essex). If the weather is really clear you can even see the off-shore wind turbines beyond The Naze in Walton. Back inside the viewing area, you will find interactive displays, lots of information, videos and exhibits. Decent bathrooms and babychange facilities are provided too.

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The Ferry Cafe

That’s not all though! Languard Point forms one of Suffolk’s many unique habitats- the vegetated shingle habitat of the Landguard Nature Reserve, with its rare plants, migrating birds and military history. Go bird-watching, take a cycle ride or stroll along the beach and run along the  boardwalk which is also suitable for wheelchair users and buggies.This  offers easier access to the seashore and wildlife, as well as views of the ships at the nearby Port of Felixstowe. Overlooking the Nature Reserve is the Landguard Bird Observatory which rings and records migratory birds as they pass by on their way in and out of Britain. It also identifies and records moths. Many migrating birds are attracted to the area by the lights of the nearby Port of Felixstowe, so bring your binoculars and camera and check out the board outside the observatory for the latest sightings. Don’t forget to record any sightings of your own.

Afterwards, explore the rich military and maritime heritage of Landguard Fort, one of England’s best-preserved coastal defences, with a history spanning almost 450 years. At the neighbouring Felixstowe Museum, the fascinating artefacts and collections which bring alive the military and social history of this seaside town are displayed.

DOWNLOAD the Landguard Peninsula and Felixstowe andTrimley circular walk leaflets. Please note: these documents are in pdf format, and you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view or print.

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Dramatic night views of Felixstowe Port

The Fludyers Hotel provides a cosy bar or an outdoor terrace from which to observe the comings and goings too. They serve Adnams and we can think of no better way to spend an afternoon dreaming of travel on the high seas, far removed from the unromantic forms of modern travel- Ryanair cattle trucks and atmosphere deficient modern cruise liners.

 (2) From big ships to little boats

Want to go back in time to an Enid Byton-esque childhood of fishing boats, clanking moorings and puddles of rusting chains; the smell of fresh fish and cries of sea birds and sandy kneed children huddled around rock pools on deserted beaches? Or do you yearn for Arthur Ransome style meanderings in a small boat, puttering from jetty to jetty, commandered by men and women who make their livelihood from the grey North Sea waters? Felixstowe can provide all this and more and this is why we love it so.

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Winkles at the Ferry

To the north of the town is the tiny fishing village of Felixstowe Ferry with its few houses, fishing huts built out of salt scoured pitch black boards and ramshackle leaning holiday homes on stilts. The Ferry Inn, a church and the Ferry cafe,cluster together on the land which finally runs out at the jetty. Want to eat before you go to Bawdsey? Winkles at the Ferry is a gorgeously atmospheric eating place overlooking the River Deben offering an outdoor raised terrace directly over the waters as well as indoor seating too. Serving freshly cooked food all day, the ingredients are all sourced locally, then go for a stroll along the pebbled river banks. Have a walk along the sea front, lunch at the cafe or pub and marvel at the Martello Towers that line the sea front and guarded us against sea invasions. A tiny ferry boat will then take you to Bawdsey Island, the secret WWII facility and home to the inventor of the radar. Whilst you await the boat, while away the time crabbing off the jetty. All you need is a crabbing line (crabbing kits are sold in many of the local seafront stores), some pieces of bacon (as smelly as possible) and a bucket of salt water to keep the crabs in safely until it is time to return them to the sea. Walberswick is the place many visitors to Suffolk mention when talking about crabbing but Felixstowe is just as good- the crabs like bacon here too!

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The foot and cycle ferry

The ferry operates between Easter and October, running on demand and according to the weather. Call 01394 282173 or 07709 411511 for more information.  Bawdsey Island Quay  has a good stretch of sandy beach for children to play on, and a lovely Boathouse Cafe to enjoy freshly caught local fish in and you can visit the place where the ground breaking work in radar technology took place. RAF Bawdsey, operational in 1937, was the first of a chain of radar stations to be built around the coast of Britain. During the Battle of Britain with 2,600 Luftwaffe planes to the RAF’s 640, it was the use of radar for detecting aircraft en route to the UK so they could be intercepted that saved the day.

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Felixstowe Ferry with Bawdsey Island across the water

It is also possible to pay a visit to Essex via the Harwich Harbour Foot Ferry– the only foot ferry linking Harwich, Felixstowe and Shotley. This jolly little yellow boat runs from the Ha’penny Pier in Harwich to the John Bradfield Viewing Area at Felixstowe . It also offers trips along the River Stour which forms part of the geographical border between Essex and Suffolk and the river Orwell (from which the author Eric Blair took his pen name – George Orwell) offering stunning scenes of pastures, river banks, estuaries and woodlands- the likes of which have inspired artists and authors for centuries. Booking is not essential, but is advisable during busy periods. Call 07919 911440.

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The Harwich – Felixstowe Foot Ferry

 (3) Rainy day fun at Felixstowe Leisure Centre

We are in Britain and we need to be realistic that even at the height of Summer, there are going to be days when the sun doesn’t shine, leaving us with a restless armload of kids requiring entertainment. And not of the Minecraft kind either. When we asked folks on Twitter for their suggestions about what’s best in Felixstowe, the leisure centre (and specifically the pool) was mentioned over and over. From bowling, soft play and all manner of classes and special events to the fantastic swimming, this is THE place for indoor and healthy fun that admission fees aside, won’t cause more money to haemorrhage from your wallet. Right on the seafront, it is easy to find and conveniently located for those post swim hunger pangs that tend to require immediate attention unless you’ve bought a packed lunch or can swiftly get them home before they notice the doughnuts, candy floss, burgers and chips sold across the promenade at the pier.

(4) The Pier at Felixstowe

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The pier

Completed in 1905, this was once one of the longest piers in the country with its own train running to the end but the vast majority of it was demolished after the second world war There are plans to re-develop it in 2015 yet part of its charm is that quintessential Englishness; slightly ramshackle, gaudy, all fur coat and no knickers. We have youthful memories of chasing boys, coyly hiding as we watched our chosen ones look our way then swagger off with their mates. Listening to ABBA, Baccara and Donna Summer fade in and out as the rides swirled round, staggering off them and trying to remain cool and upright- none of this has changed apart from the music which is now Robin Thicke, JayZ and Rihanna. But there are still billowing and giggling crowds of teenagers roaming back and forth, enjoying the slightly dangerous, reckless air of the fairground and often being far from home too.

The fast rides on the pier are gone now but the fast food and candy kiosks at the entrance are still lit up with illuminations that drawn you in and spit you out into a vivid world of primary coloured pinging brash arcade games, children’s rides and yet more food kiosks. Kids dart everywhere followed by parents trying to keep an eye on them, clutching bulging bags of neon bright candy floss. The relative calm of the fishing platforms and boardwalks at the end of the pier give fabulous views of the container ships and ferries en route to and from the port, calming the most raucous of kids. In Winter, the sunsets are beautiful offering us the best views of those famous, endless Suffolk skies.

(5) Hire out a beach hut

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Beach huts- photo by Joe Bridge

We were fortunate enough to have friends who had permanent use of one of these huts but it is possible to hire one by the day. A number of privately owned beach huts plus two Council owned huts are available for hire throughout the season (from Easter until the end of September) at various different locations. A list of these huts and booking forms are available from the Felixstowe Tourist Information Centre on 01394 276770 or by emailing ftic@suffolkcoastal.gov.uk 

During the winter months one of the Council owned beach huts is available for daily hire whilst in its winter location on the promenade at a charge of £20.00 per day. This can be booked by calling 01394 276770 or emailingftic@suffolkcoastal.gov.uk

(6) The garden resort of East Anglia and walking the promenade

Walk south along the pram friendly wide, tarmac of the promenade, interspersed with benches for breastfeeding or other pit stops and notice how the maritime climate encourages the growth of palm trees and healthy, floriferous borders. These are beautifully maintained by the local councils horticultural teams alongside volunteers. The promenade is wide and flat enough for children to scoot along and get a little ahead of their parents whilst remaining within sight. The area between Manor End and Cobbold’s Point is Felixstowe’s main seafront and can be walked along a two mile long promenade. This will take you past a number of the towns most famous landmarks including Manning’s Amusements, originally opened in 1933 by Sir Billy Butlin, and run by the Manning family since 1946.north beach by chris leather

The Seafront Gardens sit on cliffs between the town centre and beach, rising up and following the curve of the road which takes you to the shops. These beautiful landscaped and sumptuously planted gardens were created a hundred years ago in the best Edwardian tradition and stretch for more than a mile alongside the promenade. Take time to wander through them and uncover the many historical features, structures and colourful and unusual planting that make this such a beautiful place to visit.

(7) Trimley Marshes Nature Reserve

Slightly out of town but well worth a visit, these wetland marshes have been created almost entirely from arable land situated within the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. There are wonderful views of the Orwell estuary from here and a vast array of bird species and other creatures to look out for. The car park is nearly a mile away from the first bird hide though so younger children probably won’t manage to walk all the way and a sling or baby carrier might be advisable. There are picnic facilities and disabled access is provided too.

(8) The Palace Cinema

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Newly restored and refurbished, this classic old school and independent cinema offers two air conditioned screens with luxurious seating with food served to you as you watch the film.Taking children here to get a taste of how cinema could be is top of our list.

(9) Pick your own fruit

Situated just off the A14 at Trimley St Martin (near the Trimley Marshes Nature Reserve), Goslings Farm Shop offers another classic British Summer and Autumn experience- picking your own fruit. Open daily, hungry children can eat in the on site Strawberry Cafe and then wander around the plant centre and nursery afterwards. In our experience, children absolutely love pick your own fruit, enjoy learning about how it is grown and on a sunny day, it is hard to beat for sheer fun.

(10) Eat out and shop

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Chilli & Chives Cafe

Recommended by a Mumsnetter, The Alex has an unrivalled location, sited right across from the seafront promenade. From the ground floor cafe bar serving breakfasts and drinks to the first floor brasserie (with lift access), serving seafood, grill and classic brasserie style food plus a set menu, people seeking good food in sophisticated yet relaxing surroundings will be made most welcome. Want somewhere that’ll occupy the kids while you relax with cake and a drink? Crafty Coffee is a bright, fresh arts and crafts cafe by the sea, offering space to unwind whilst the children get busy. Kids and adults can take part in ceramics painting, decoupage and knitting workshops whilst eating cakes too, all baked on the premises. Chilli & Chives is a little tearoom which also has branches in Lavenham and Hintlesham serving cakes, teas and light meals and overlooks the seafront gardens. Mooching west along Undercliff Road in search of more ice cream we came across The Little Ice Cream Company which serves fresh artisanal ice cream made from milk produced by the cows of Adams Farm. Soups, sandwiches and other light snacks are served too although to be honest, a steep walk up the cliff road should be rewarded by ice cream and nothing else in our opinion. Want a trad fish and chips eating experience? The Fish Dish restaurant is a huge place over two floors serving boat fresh fish, masses of mushy peas and platters full of properly thick seaside chips. Black leather banquettes, tiles, Spanish style white painted arches, waitress service and stripped wood staircases and floors make this place hard to define.

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Fish Dish Restaurant

Seasides mean seaside rock and The Sweet Hut sells plenty of this in case you hit the town and missed the myriad sweet and candy huts lining the area near the amusements. Also located in the heart of the town centre is the Felixstowe Triangle Canopy, a public space with a varied events programme throughout the year from acoustic music to living statues, table top sales and more. On Sundays you’ll find the very popular market held in the grounds of Mannings Amusements. From classic bric a brac and pound an item to lovely plants, food stalls and more, there’s a lot to look at and see. We’re huge fans of the classic design of the amusement building with its twin towers, fountain, arcade and kiosks all in a sea salt faded pink. Had this building been located in Miami, it’d have a national preservation order placed upon it by now.

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A Felixstowe local keeps an eye out to sea

 

 

 

 

 

Telling it like it is’ -Saint Audry’s + the story of an asylum

“No restraint can be employed which is so powerful as tenderness.” Dr John Kirkman, Medical Superintendent (1829-1876)

ST AUDRY’S PROJECT- TELLING IT LIKE IT IS

 

The St Audry’s project is a Comic Relief funded project exploring the history of St Audry’s Hospital and it draws upon contemporary experiences in a consideration of how attitudes to mental health have changed. Artist Juliet Lockhart has worked on the St Audry’s project alongside local people to depict the hospital, its history and attitudes towards mental illness both yesterday and today.

St Audry’s Hospital, situated in rural Suffolk, closed its doors in 1993.  Originally a workhouse, it became the Suffolk County Asylum in 1832.  Countless people passed though the hospital, for many it became home, and they left behind their stories, some of which are recorded, the majority lost. Sadly the nature of mental health means that patients historically have been voiceless both politically and culturally- how many people today know that a person under a section of the Mental Health Act legally cannot vote? In addition, data protection and privacy laws means that a hundred years must pass from the death of the last patient before any personal details can be released into the public realm. 

In 2012, a project was set up by the Museum of East Anglian Life to explore the hidden history of St Audry’s. The Museum, alongside Felixstowe Museum and the Suffolk Record Office, were recipients of the hospital museum collection and archive when it closed.  ‘Telling it like is: the story of a psychiatric hospital in Suffolk’ collaborated with mental health service users to create work to accompany a permanent display in Abbot’s Hall, part of the Museum. The project also explored and recorded people’s emotional connections with the St Audry’s site.

Artist Juliet Lockhart worked alongside the Museum to deliver a series of textile, stitching and creative writing workshops.  From these workshops came a wealth of material that informed two artworks, now on display in Abbot’s Hall.

The workshops were designed so that people could participate in as many as they wanted to.  Some came just once, others were regulars throughout the project.

Using the collection housed at the Museum as a starting point, people began to explore issues around mental health through art and writing.  Words such as ‘lunatic’ and ‘asylum’ were discussed and ideas sprang from associated thoughts about the values and judgements society (and the individuals who make this up)  ascribe to people and therefore the words they choose to describe them with;

     “lunatic should be accepted as a word     

          from history that is

          now outdated”.  F.M.

 The first textile pieces produced were a series of images and texts using cyanotype fabric prints.  These distinctive blue and white prints were created by designs drawn onto acetate which were then used in a similar way to a photographic negative.  The acetate was placed onto the chemically treated fabric, exposed for a few minutes in sunlight and then rinsed in plain water.  During the process the fabric undergoes several colourchanges before the original image appears in white against a blue background.

The images produced were emotional responses to objects in the Museum.  The Black Shuck is part of the folklore of East Anglia.  A ghostly black dog is said to roam the highways and byways.  A terrifying sight, a beast associated with the Devil and a harbinger of disaster.  For the artist of this piece, The Black Shuck represents her depression, sometimes it is overwhelming, at times it shrinks but it is always there hovering, ever present and interestingly, the ‘Black Dog’ is a common metaphor for depressive disorder, Winston Churchill famously called his depression the very same name. 

Simple printmaking techniques were also explored during these sessions and some of the thoughts that came from discussions around mental health were incorporated onto the fabric pieces.

The textile sessions went on to inspire the creative writing workshops and through a series of writing prompts and visual images, a selection of poems emerged.

TELLING IT LIKE IT IS 

This tree has no root system.

 The branches are fragmented

much like my existence.

 On a road to nowhere.

 Leaves on branches that bear no fruit or future,

malnourished waiting to fail and die.

 The leaves shake as if nervous with a gentle breeze.

The branches sway as a large feather

to the white clouds above.

 

Clearing a passage to the sky

so I can finally rest in pieces .

 After the ten workshops had ended there was pile of images, words, paper and fabric that needed to be brought together somehow but from the outset of the project, the work produced was always driven by the individual. No set rules meant that each person could respond to the themes however they wished with the guidance of Juliet Lockhart.   The finished pieces differed in size, content and execution as a consequence; an important metaphor for people so often defined amorphously when in fact they are as unique as any other societal group.  Ruth Gillan, the project manager took inspiration from a photograph of a ward in St Audry’s when it was first opened.

A replica of part of the room divider shown in the photograph was commissioned with the idea that the panes of glass would be replaced by a series of fabric panels. 

 

A series of sewing workshops took place in the splendid dining room in Abbot’s Hall.

The various pieces of text and images were stitched, appliqued and embroidered before being joined together as crazy patchwork.  Crazy patchwork uses irregular piece of fabric combined to create a haphazard design.  Crazy patchwork is usually embellished with embroidery, as well as  buttons, lace and ribbons.  It is extremely creative and free flowing and so fitted in with the ethos behind the artwork.

 Many of the panels were worked on by more than one person.  Pieces of fabric were passed around for someone to stitch words on, someone else to add a border and someone else to embroider.  Some of the pieces went home to be worked on and some to Woodlands, the mental health unit at Ipswich Hospital.  Fabric and threads were confined to a blue palette to create unity.

Finally the crazy patchwork was mounted onto wooden frames and fixed into the wooden door frame.

Juliet Lockhart worked on the second artwork to be installed.   Ruth Gillan had sourced an original metal hospital screen, the kind that was used to provide a modicum of privacy in a crowded ward.

 She began her research by visiting the Suffolk Records Office to look at some of the old 19th century admissions records from St Audry’s. On some of the pages staff had clipped photographs of patients.

Juliet wanted to give these patients a presence in the collection at the Museum.  She used two of these images to create shadow figures, which she cut out of muslin and bonded onto a muslin panel.

Further inspiration was a comment made by a participant during one of the creative writing workshops.

 ‘I would like labels in life to become a thing of the past’

 Juliet made white labels and printed them with a variety of diagnoses and slang words connected with mental health.  Some of these were sourced from the admissions records, others more up to date.

The aim of this artwork was to stimulate a discussion around the use of labels.  She asked a series of questions, Should a label define who we are?  Who creates these labels and why?  Do we treat people differently if we know that they are labeled as having a mental illness?  Does a label such as ‘schizophrenic’ or ‘psychotic’ actually provide help to a person?  Do we know what that label means or do we just take a guess?  Does that label undermine the humanity of a person?  Do labels become our identity?  Are labels positive or negative?  Do we try to see the person behind the label?  Should labels become a thing of the past?

The artwork seen and text reproduced in this report were created by Juliet Lockhart, Melissa, J.A.M., Richard and Fred.

Thanks go to Comic Relief for funding this project.

 

Three family friendly walks in Norfolk and Suffolk

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Happy baby feet on the beach

Thorpeness to Aldeburgh

For families with young children, whether they be babies in prams or older toddlers who may need to rest their legs by riding in a buggy for part of the way, this walk along the beautiful Suffolk coastline is fully pram friendly. Crossing nature reserves, taking you to the famous Aldeburgh beach with its Maggie Hambling shell sculpture and back again should you so wish, it is like a ‘greatest hits of the Suffolk coastline’. If you decide to walk it, do come back and let us know what you thought by posting a comment below.

(1) Park at Thorpeness Beach car park and turn right towards the Meare. Walk past the Meare, turning left into the road that takes you to the Golf Club.

(2) Once at the Golf Club, turn right and then take the footpath on your left down to the side of the Golf Club.

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Thorpeness Meare

(3) Stay on this path with the Meare to your left and at the end of this path you will emerge with the stone cottage to the front of you. Turn left and bear round to the left where you will see signs to the North Warren RSPB reserve.

(4) Keep the sign on your right and proceed with the Meare to your left and the woodland to your right initially. This is actually the old railway line leading to Aldeburgh; stay on this path with views of the North Warren Reserve (beautiful views too!) and the coast to your left until you reach Church Farm Holiday Park (please note that the second section of this path is permissive).

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Maggie Hamblings Shell

(5) Follow the footpath signs taking you through the campsite to the main entrance where you turn left towards the famous Maggie Hambling Shell sculpture on Aldeburgh beach. Cross the main road and go across the beach car park . If you want to spend some time in the town of Aldeburgh, this is a good time to do so; there are plenty of fabulous places to eat, drink and shop in including the famous fish and chips. Toilets can be found in front of Aldeburgh Moot Hall (about 500m from the car park) and don’t forget to show the children the little bronze sculpture of ‘Snook’ the dog that overlooks the boating pond near Moot Hall. The statue of Snooks was originally installed in honour to his owner, Dr Acheson, who cared for the community from 1931 to 1959 and he got his name from the cans of tinned ‘fish’ called Snook that the family ate during the war

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Snook

(6) With the ‘Shell’ ahead of you, pick up the paved path at the back of the beach. Turn left and head back towards Thorpeness, through the Havens, back to the Thorpeness car park.

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Moot Hall

n.b- This walk can also be done in reverse from Thorpeness- Head south through the Haven Beach car park near the Aldeburgh shell sculpture. Or park at the shell and walk either way to Thorpeness.

Tyrells Wood in Norfolk

(2) Moving up to Norfolk now and the lovely Tyrells Wood whose existence was first recorded back in 1251 although the eighties saw an attempt to fell the trees- look around and you will see the now badly eroded paint marks on the oaks scheduled for the chop. This is a great all year round walk but the winter sees it especially lovely due to the large and mature hollies that grow there and the fact that somebody nips into the woods in December and decorates one of the trees with baubles for Christmas.

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Photo by A F Huff

 

The woods are fine as they are for an afternoon or early morning wander but if you want more strenuous exercise or just a longer walk (around 5 miles), then keep on north on the (signposted) Boudicca Way until you reach Mayfield Farm and loop off to Shelton- stop and admire the Tudor church while you are there too and the grounds of Shelton Hall, an estate which has around 72 acres of surrounding fields: the names of the fields include “Magic field” and “Echo field” alongside a moat around the house and another smaller one in one of the fields. Continue along the peaceful Norfolk country lanes via Hardwick and don’t forget to look up and around at those skies- they are huge. Hungry folks can stop off at Goodies Food Hall for farm produce, drinks, snacks and even Christmas lunches during December.

Photo from norfolkpilgrim.blogspot.com
Photo of Shelton Church from norfolkpilgrim.blogspot.com

Snape Maltings and the Suffolk coastline

(3) Back to Suffolk again for the third walk finds us at Snape with its world famous concert halls, farmers market and shopping complex surrounded by reedbeds, boardwalks and public art. The Suffolk Coast & Heathlands AONB produces a leaflet, which makes more suggestions for walking trails, including this walk which is approximately 3 miles long on easy paths and that lovely boardwalk. Check it out on Ordnance Survey map Explorer 212. Your start point is OS Reference 392 575.

Sarah Lucas' Perceval at Snape Maltings
Sarah Lucas’ Perceval at Snape Maltings

1. With your back to the Plough & Sail turn left and walk for approximately 50 yards until you reach a red brick arch which leads into the main Maltings complex. Go through the arch and carry on straight, passing the Hoffman building to your left. Head straight over the carpark and look for a gap in the hedge where the information board ‘Snape Explorer can be found. Go through the gap and turn right. 75 yards later the path meets another with a public footpath sign and the river is to your left as is the Sarah Lucas sculpture ‘Perceval’ of a shire horse. Your path lies straight ahead.

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Walk along the longer stretch of boardwalk and as you reemerge onto a path you will reach the Iken Cliff Picnic Site where the path you are on, exits left. Keeping to the edge of the house with a ‘no parking’ sign, take the pathway through a slatted wooden fence (don’t turn left) and you’ll soon encounter the Ropes Kiln, an 18th century lime kiln. The shoreline will be immediately to your left and there will be properties above you, on the right. At the end of these you’ll find a set of steps and a footpath sign. If you want to continue via a longer walk, follow the Suffolk Coast and Heaths pathway up them.

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For those not following a longer route the walks furthest reach before you retrace your steps is the stretch of shore and beach below Iken Hall. To return to Snape follow the walk in reverse taking car not to miss the path that leads to the picnic area.

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We eat burgers at Shakes ‘n Baps in Sudbury

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If you don’t take a trip to Sudbury to eat these burgers you are out of your mind. We’ve eaten at all the London burger joints- you know, the ones that carry on as if they have re-invented the wheel with their self aggrandising statements about their wonderful burgers. Well we have news for Dirty Burger, Shakeshack and Byrons- Shakes ‘n Baps has just blown you out of the water. 

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These onion rings were actually the size of side plate!

Not in the most picturesque of locations with its frontage facing the Sudbury ring road and roundabout, nonetheless, the restaurant is worth a minutes walk from the centre of town and it is conveniently near the car parks, the town play park and the other shops on King St. Furnished with stripped wood tables, chairs  set in a simple space; a clean bathroom with room to change babies; plenty of highchairs and a kids menu with a full meal+drink for only £4, this would make a great place to take children, for kids get togethers and post exam celebrations. If my children were at the prom age, I’d be booking them in pre event to line their stomachs. Books, newspapers and games are piled onto the window sill for their customers and on this sunny and warm day, we were happy to linger here.

Shakes ‘n Baps do host regular daytime and evening promotions alongside their regular menu – World Cup Specials with a burger+fried+beer for £6 (they are also licensed); Ben Smith, the talented local guitarist comes and plays and they offer special refunds to anybody who completes one of several eating challenges.  Customers are asked to suggest and vote on ideas for burgers- a recent one raised funds for local charity festival ‘Leestock’ held in Long Melford. Steaks and hot dogs are on the menu too in various combinations- with blue cheese, chile, with bacon and regular cheese although I imagine you could ask for an off menu combination of add-ons and they’d do it.

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The amazing ‘Sweet Cheeks’ burger

 

One of the few local places to be found serving their burgers in Brioche buns, we ordered the current special, the ‘Sweet Cheeks’ a 6oz burger topped with BBQ pulled pig cheeks, caramelised onions and beetroot slaw accompanied by giant onion rings and proper fries after seeing it on Twitter and Facebook. The vegetarian had the Halloumi and mushroom burger with fries; both came with pickles, tomato and lettuce.

This burger was eye-rollingly good with the richness of  slowly cooked down pork cheeks, mollified by a sharp, Balsamic rich slip of onions served on top of the meat and covered with just the right amount of cheese- We;ve had too many burgers served with too heavy a blanket of it which subsumes the flavour but not here. The beetroot slaw is a genius idea-well as being brilliantly neon, it had a light and sweet taste with the deeper, earthier undertones of the beet -a perfect compliment to the sweetness of the pork and onions, but not overkill. The fries have a fabulous roughed up surface leaving them extra crunchy, even after they had been salted. Usually even the best fries collapse into soft potato sticks when you add the salt but these were still snap-sharp ten minutes after we received them. You can also choose hand cut fat chips but we craved the crunchier skinny versions.

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Gorgeous sweet brioche burger buns

The Halloumi in the Vegetarian burger was very well prepared, salty, crunchy on the outside and with that fabulous squeaky texture it should retain, even after frying. The Vegetarian normally doesn’t like flat mushrooms in burgers because he finds their texture too ‘wodgy’ but this one passed his high standards. He could also have had another option currently being trialled- 2 Quorn fillets fried in a home mixed Cajun breadcrumb coating. Onion rings came in a super crispy batter but retained their softness inside- no bitterness, no greasy coating forming inside as they cooled. They were still good cold because it took us a LONG time to work through our meal as it was huge.

Vegetarian man ordered a Vanilla Malt Shake from the menu of 25 different flavours, many of them inspired by popular candies. Made with fresh milk, it was served in a classic covered sippy pot and seemed a popular take out choice, especially with kids coming from the park and skate park over the road. Some desserts are also offered alongside home made fudge. Other drinks? Lager, cider, wine, all manner of soft drinks plus tea and fresh cafetieres of coffee.

We hope the people of Suffolk support this really really good little place. The prices are affordable (especially the special offers), the people are lovely and we need a place to eat like Shakes n Baps- it prepares fresh food, doesn’t have a ridiculously large menu (which tends to suggest that the food isn’t cooked from scratch) , the chef understands what is fashionable in food and prepares something other than  jacket potatoes and sandwiches which every other place in Sudbury seems to serve (boring). We shall be back to try the hot dogs next.

Find Shakes n Baps listing on Mumsnet Suffolk

Summer Reads – Our recommendations

Our holidays are in sight and with a deliberately enforced policy of no WiFi, we will make the time to read. Pure bliss. Here’s some books we’ve enjoyed in the past and a few that we’ll be taking with us. There’s something for most of you here and we’ll be adding to it as time (and reading) moves on.

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Mudbound by Hillary Jordan

A wonderful and heartbreaking novel set in post-World War I rural Mississippi. It deals with issues of racial tension, love and betrayal .  Having been unable to put it down the first time I read it, I simply re-read it once again.

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The Almond Picker By Simonetta Agnello Hornby

This novel is set in Sicily in 1963 and the author successfully evokes the mood of a small Sicilian town in the throes of a family crisis. It traces the history of one of the town’s most prominent families – unveiling all of their secrets and mysteries. The author is brilliant at describing all of the nuances of life in this town. You feel the heat, smell the air, crave the gossip and feel transported to Sicily. If you’ve been there you will appreciate the authenticity of the description, and if you haven’t you will want to go.

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The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

 The best journeys can be those you didn’t know you needed to take and this is one of those rare children’s novels that both delights the adult reader and returns them to a child’s perspective. Beloved since I first encountered it via my American primary school mistress aged eight, it wasn’t as popular in Britain as it was/is in the USA. Thankfully this parlous state of literary affairs has now been rectified and it has become much loved over here too.

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Ruby by Cynthia Bond

This is not just the tale of a young woman clawing her way to survival in a world that seems hellbent on destroying her. It is also a story evolved from the author’s personal history.  When she was a girl, Bond heard the stories of how her aunt, a young black woman, was believed to have been murdered by Ku Klux Klansmen in the 1930s for her relationship with a white man. The crime went unpunished. And Bond herself was the victim of sexual abuse as a child. Hence, Ruby is born of the pain of women as unwilling and unwitting victims. Scenes of raw violence and pain are mitigated by the sheer beauty of the prose, but not an easy read all the same.

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Pilgrimage to Dollywood by Helen Morales

How could we NOT want to take this as part balm and consolation for our lack of tickets to see Dolly do Glasto this summer of ’14.  Asides her colossally successful musical career, Dolly is also the only female star to have her own themed amusement park: Dollywood in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Every year thousands of fans flock to Dollywood to celebrate the icon, and Helen Morales is one of those fans.

In Pilgrimage to Dollywood, Morales sets out to discover Parton’s Tennessee. Her travels begin at the top celebrity pilgrimage site of Elvis Presley’s Graceland and finally to Pigeon Forge, home of the “Dolly Homecoming Parade”. Morales’s adventure allows her to compare the imaginary Tennessee of Parton’s lyrics with the real Tennessee where the singer grew up, looking at essential connections between country music, the land, and a way of life. It’s also a personal pilgrimage for Morales. Accompanied by her partner, Tony, and their nine-year-old daughter, Athena (who respectively prefer Mozart and Miley Cyrus), Morales, a recent transplant from England, seeks to understand America and American values through the celebrity sites and attractions of Tennessee. This celebration of Dolly and Americana is for anyone with an old country soul who relies on music to help understand the world, and it is guaranteed to make a Dolly Parton fan of anyone who has not yet fallen for her music or charisma.

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My Ideal Bookshelf by Jane Mount and Thessaly La Force

A good book for the bookshelf voyeurist whose first action upon going to a persons house is to nose through their book collection.. Find out what cool people like Patti Smith, Roseanne Cash, Alice Waters and Judd Apatow stock on their shelves, through interviews and Jane Mount’s book spine paintings.

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The book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez

“We’re the unknown Americans,” says a character in Cristina Henríquez’s second novel, “the ones no one even wants to know, because they’ve been told they’re supposed to be scared of us and because maybe if they did take the time to get to know us, they might realize that we’re not that bad, maybe even that we’re a lot like them.”

That declaration bluntly explains the theme of “The Book of Unknown Americans,” as does the novel’s choral structure — made up of first-person reminiscences from an array of characters from Latin American countries including Mexico, Panama, Guatemala, Paraguay, Nicaragua and Venezuela, all of whom talk to us directly about their reasons for coming to the United States.

Central to the book is the account of the lives of its two central characters: a beautiful Mexican teenager named Maribel Rivera and her admiring friend and neighbor, Mayor Toro. Maribel has learning difficulties as a result of an accident, the details of which slowly become apparent in much the same way as one learns about the back stories of new friends.

Homesickness, dislocution and displacement; a yearning to belong and a yearning to preserve that which makes them different characterises the immigrant experience, something that is enhanced by the stories being set in Delaware- a state that is not the first to come to mind when one thinks of a destination. Very clever. Reading this book on holiday at my brothers home in Germany, listening to his own account of his loneliness and linguistic alienation, watching how he is now assimilated to the point of forgetting some of his native English enhanced the reading, ramming home the brutal reality of being a stranger in a land that represents so much to them prior to their arrival whilst appearing confusingly familiar too.